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  • Burning fried chicken (HELP)

    I've been trying to make simple fried chicken, and it keeps burning! I swear, I follow the directions to a T. Each site I've visited has about the same directions, it's not difficult.

    * I marinate them overnight in buttermilk (makes a big difference)

    * bring them to room temp

    * mix up the breading (flour and spices), dipped once, let them rest

    I have tried deep frying in a large pot and in a regular pan. The oil is kept at or near 350 (between 300/350 always) -- 12 minutes per side (thighs only) and they BURN!

    They don't taste too bad, super crunchy like dark potato chips vs regular, and the meat is fine. But I honestly don't understand why this is happening.

    Many years ago, my roommate made fried chicken in a simple pan, with about 1/4" oil -- no thermometer, never had a problem.

    What am I doing wrong?

    HELP.

  • #2


    Hi, forrie!

    You might want to try next time, to only fry the chicken about 3/4 of the way, and then finish it in the oven on a rack in a baking pan at a holding temp of about 250 degrees for about15 to 20 minutes.

    You'll never have to worry about burnt chicken again! Good luck!

    ~BDH.

    I am the King of Kitchen Toys!!!!!! http://www.cookingforums.net/core/im...ilies/wink.png

    Comment


    • #3
      Buttermilk will help it to burn. I tried using the buttermilk as a marinade and the chicken got very dark before it was cooked.
      If I were to use buttermilk again (I will not) I will make sure to drain and dry off the pieces before flouring.

      You did not tell us what type of pan you are using nor did you tell us what type of stove you have. Gas or electric.

      Here is a tried and true method.
      Add 1 inch of oil to a very heavy fry pan like cast iron. I use a heavy aluminum pan.
      Turn burner to medium. Allow to heat while you get the chicken ready for frying.

      Dry off chicken pieces and dredge in plain ole flour.
      Shake off excess and add one small piece to the hot oil. (this will tell you if the oil is hot enough).
      Add more pieces to the preheated oil without crowding pan.
      Cover for 10 minutes.
      Remove cover and turn when one side is brown.
      Turn them once until the pieces are nice and brown.
      Drain on wire rack.

      I think you are using a thin walled pan. And the buttermilk is part of the problem if your not draining the chicken pieces and drying them off before dredging.
      Use plain flour! Do not use bread crumbs unless you are going to make oven fried chicken.

      Comment


      • #4
        I find that the type of skillet and oil are large factors for frying chicken. A cast iron skillet is preferable and lard is my favorite rather than oil.

        Also do you cover the chicken while frying?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Roll_Bones View Post
          Buttermilk will help it to burn. I tried using the buttermilk as a marinade and the chicken got very dark before it was cooked.
          If I were to use buttermilk again (I will not) I will make sure to drain and dry off the pieces before flouring.

          You did not tell us what type of pan you are using nor did you tell us what type of stove you have. Gas or electric.

          Here is a tried and true method.
          Add 1 inch of oil to a very heavy fry pan like cast iron. I use a heavy aluminum pan.
          Turn burner to medium. Allow to heat while you get the chicken ready for frying.

          Dry off chicken pieces and dredge in plain ole flour.
          Shake off excess and add one small piece to the hot oil. (this will tell you if the oil is hot enough).
          Add more pieces to the preheated oil without crowding pan.
          Cover for 10 minutes.
          Remove cover and turn when one side is brown.
          Turn them once until the pieces are nice and brown.
          Drain on wire rack.

          I think you are using a thin walled pan. And the buttermilk is part of the problem if your not draining the chicken pieces and drying them off before dredging.
          Use plain flour! Do not use bread crumbs unless you are going to make oven fried chicken.

          I've used buttermilk many times, and had no problem with it.

          I add the buttermilk to the chicken pieces, along with the seasonings. I even add an egg or two, Beaten. The mixture soaks into the meat overnight while in the fridge. The next day, I take the chicken pieces out, let them drain a little, dredge them in the flour, which has a slightly additional seasonings.

          After letting the oil get hot, I add the pieces to it, being very careful not to overcrowd the skillet. About 6 to 7minutes per side. I purposely cook it 3/4 of the way. Then it goes into a pan and placed in the oven at a holding temp of about 250 degrees. This helps assure that the chicken isn't burnt, nor is it undercooked.
          Last edited by Big Daddy's House; 08-06-2016, 06:49 AM.
          ~BDH.

          I am the King of Kitchen Toys!!!!!! http://www.cookingforums.net/core/im...ilies/wink.png

          Comment


          • #6
            Oops, I did omit my frying environment - sorry, I was just so frustrated.

            I'm using canola oil in a deep stovetop aluminum pan; but, I also did so in an iron (Martha Stewart) dutch oven. This is on an electric cooktop stove (Kenmore). Both had the same results. Now, these were bone-in chicken thighs, which can take longer to cook.

            I like the buttermilk marinade as it does make the meat taste better, I have found. I didn't realize there was a higher risk of burning. Generally, recipes call for taking the chicken out of the marinade and directly applying the breading to that, which is what I've done.

            In my case, I fried no more than three thighs at the same time - there was plenty of room.

            I know others prefer to brine the chicken, so perhaps I could try that as an alternative.

            I don't cover the chicken when it's trying, save for a splatter screen.


            Thanks!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by forrie View Post
              Oops, I did omit my frying environment - sorry, I was just so frustrated.

              I'm using canola oil in a deep stovetop aluminum pan; but, I also did so in an iron (Martha Stewart) dutch oven. This is on an electric cooktop stove (Kenmore). Both had the same results. Now, these were bone-in chicken thighs, which can take longer to cook.

              I like the buttermilk marinade as it does make the meat taste better, I have found. I didn't realize there was a higher risk of burning. Generally, recipes call for taking the chicken out of the marinade and directly applying the breading to that, which is what I've done.

              In my case, I fried no more than three thighs at the same time - there was plenty of room.

              I know others prefer to brine the chicken, so perhaps I could try that as an alternative.

              I don't cover the chicken when it's trying, save for a splatter screen.


              Thanks!

              If you're deep frying the chicken, you may want to switch to a oil that has a higher heat tolerance, such as peanut oil or soybean oil (the less expensive one).

              Since deep frying requires the oil to be at a higher temp of about 350 degrees, you need to have oil that can match the needs of deep frying, and not smoke itself or burn the chicken.

              Canola oil is good, but it is not meant for deep frying, since it has a much lower heat tolerance. But it is excellent for PAN frying the chicken, where you'd have to turn the chicken pieces over.

              A lot of times, I get the urge to deep fry, but then the burning question is what do I do with all that oil afterwards? How do I get it used up soon enough without it spoiling and becoming rancid? I only deep fry when the mood hits me. I mostly like to pan fry the chicken. With the burner set at about medium, but hot enough where the chicken starts to fry the instant that it hits the hot oil.

              ~BDH.

              I am the King of Kitchen Toys!!!!!! http://www.cookingforums.net/core/im...ilies/wink.png

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Big Daddy's House View Post
                A lot of times, I get the urge to deep fry, but then the burning question is what do I do with all that oil afterwards? How do I get it used up soon enough without it spoiling and becoming rancid? I only deep fry when the mood hits me. I mostly like to pan fry the chicken. With the burner set at about medium, but hot enough where the chicken starts to fry the instant that it hits the hot oil.
                Let me be clear. When we fry chicken, we use about 1 inch of oil. When the pieces are in, they are almost covered with oil. Not quite covered and need to be turned.

                Secondly, I use a Fry Daddy for most tasks like chicken wings. I leave it on the counter covered for long periods of time with no issue. In fact, I have never met rancid oil. Seriously. I hear this all the time and I use lots of oil and have never had any oil go rancid. I have had a bottle of chili oil on my counter that i made for over 1 year and its still fine. Lost the reddish color, but is still good.
                I use whats in the Fry Daddy until it needs straining out and then I use it again and again if it looks okay.

                If the OP is using a heavy pan, the correct oil (I have no issue using canola as we used it for years) and does not over heat the oil, no burning should occur.
                Did you tell us what you are dredging the chicken in? Flour or bread crumbs? We use plain flour and salt and pepper. Nothing more.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Roll_Bones View Post

                  Let me be clear. When we fry chicken, we use about 1 inch of oil. When the pieces are in, they are almost covered with oil. Not quite covered and need to be turned.

                  Secondly, I use a Fry Daddy for most tasks like chicken wings. I leave it on the counter covered for long periods of time with no issue. In fact, I have never met rancid oil. Seriously. I hear this all the time and I use lots of oil and have never had any oil go rancid. I have had a bottle of chili oil on my counter that i made for over 1 year and its still fine. Lost the reddish color, but is still good.
                  I use whats in the Fry Daddy until it needs straining out and then I use it again and again if it looks okay.

                  If the OP is using a heavy pan, the correct oil (I have no issue using canola as we used it for years) and does not over heat the oil, no burning should occur.
                  Did you tell us what you are dredging the chicken in? Flour or bread crumbs? We use plain flour and salt and pepper. Nothing more.

                  I dredge the chicken pieces in flour. Breadcrumbs would brown too fast and possibly burn before the chicken is done. I use the Presto Options Multi-Cooker (pictured) if I have a large batch of chicken to fry. Outside of that, I use my heavy cast iron skillet. Presto Options Multi-Cooker.jpg

                  ~BDH.

                  I am the King of Kitchen Toys!!!!!! http://www.cookingforums.net/core/im...ilies/wink.png

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Big Daddy's House View Post


                    If you're deep frying the chicken, you may want to switch to a oil that has a higher heat tolerance, such as peanut oil or soybean oil (the less expensive one).

                    Since deep frying requires the oil to be at a higher temp of about 350 degrees, you need to have oil that can match the needs of deep frying, and not smoke itself or burn the chicken.

                    Canola oil is good, but it is not meant for deep frying, since it has a much lower heat tolerance. But it is excellent for PAN frying the chicken, where you'd have to turn the chicken pieces over.

                    A lot of times, I get the urge to deep fry, but then the burning question is what do I do with all that oil afterwards? How do I get it used up soon enough without it spoiling and becoming rancid? I only deep fry when the mood hits me. I mostly like to pan fry the chicken. With the burner set at about medium, but hot enough where the chicken starts to fry the instant that it hits the hot oil.


                    Interesting point, I will try a different oil. I only bought Canola oil as the recipes I looked at called for it. Seems like Peanut Oil is very common in frying, too.

                    My roomie from years ago used to make fried chicken much like you're describing. There was about 1/2" oil in there, and it was a slow fry, had to turn them. I didn't pay much attention or ask, unfortunately! But this method sounds agreeable to me, much for the convenience and the reasons you stated in dealing with leftover oil.

                    I played around with the breading, just flour, but trying different amounts of spices. I haven't found a "favorite" yet.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Its not the oil. Canola has been used forever as a deep fry multi purpose oil. We used it for years to deep fry and we only went to soybean oil in the 5 gallon containers from Costco because of price.
                      If we did not buy the bulk soybean, we would most likely use canola as it works just fine.

                      We leave the skin on our fried chicken as well, but my wife before meeting me always fried her chicken with the skin removed.
                      To be honest she is not very handy in the kitchen, yet can make some of the very best fried chicken I have ever had.
                      It is so simple and easy to do.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Roll_Bones View Post
                        Its not the oil. Canola has been used forever as a deep fry multi purpose oil. We used it for years to deep fry and we only went to soybean oil in the 5 gallon containers from Costco because of price.
                        If we did not buy the bulk soybean, we would most likely use canola as it works just fine.

                        We leave the skin on our fried chicken as well, but my wife before meeting me always fried her chicken with the skin removed.
                        To be honest she is not very handy in the kitchen, yet can make some of the very best fried chicken I have ever had.
                        It is so simple and easy to do.

                        I, also, like the skin on the chicken when it is fried or dry roasted! it is so good!!

                        But I won't eat it when it is soft, such as in the case of boiled chicken. To me, that is GROSS!!

                        ~BDH.

                        I am the King of Kitchen Toys!!!!!! http://www.cookingforums.net/core/im...ilies/wink.png

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Some people will call themselves roasting a chicken in the oven, but they cover it the whole time that it is in there! This practice makes the chicken taste BOILED, rather than roasted. The skin is all soft!! I HATE soft skin on chicken!!

                          A friend of mine does it that way. Tried to get her to just roast the chicken without covering it at all, but she just won't. it tastes good though, just that the skin is soft, and I won't eat it.
                          ~BDH.

                          I am the King of Kitchen Toys!!!!!! http://www.cookingforums.net/core/im...ilies/wink.png

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I always cover chicken and turkey in the beginning. Cook covered at 350 and finish uncovered at 425 to brown and crisp the skin. Along with brining this makes for a moist juicy poultry.
                            “If you are afraid of butter, use cream.”
                            – Julia Child

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Big Daddy's House View Post
                              Some people will call themselves roasting a chicken in the oven, but they cover it the whole time that it is in there! This practice makes the chicken taste BOILED, rather than roasted. The skin is all soft!! I HATE soft skin on chicken!!

                              A friend of mine does it that way. Tried to get her to just roast the chicken without covering it at all, but she just won't. it tastes good though, just that the skin is soft, and I won't eat it.
                              Agree 100%!

                              Comment

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