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  • An excellent pot roast

    What makes an excellent pot roast? I tend to get a little bigger one that I think I will need because no matter how I make it, it goes fast. Are there any secret ingredients that anyone here will use to put the magic touch on it? I brown the meat first so it is even and that seems to do the trick besides a few secrets I just can't part with (yet).

  • #2
    I have that problem too. I rub mine with kitchen bouquet,on all sides. Then it gets seasoned liberally on both sides with garlic powder, onion powder, salt and pepper. then seared on all sides in the enamel coated cast iron Dutch oven, then I add 1 large onion sliced, and 1 clove garlic. pour low sodium beef broth in the pot until just more than half of the beef is submerged. then I cover and cook at 350 for about 1 to 2 hours, until the meat is just fall apart tender. then I will either strain out the onions, or puree them and return them to the pan (to help thicken the gravy more with less cornstarch) I use a cornstarch and water mixture to thicken my gravy. Once we are done IF I have enough leftover (rarely happens) I will cut some up and make beef and homemade noodles, and some will go into the food processor (because I don't have a meat grinder) pulsed until it is pulverized pretty well, then I put that into a bowl, add dill pickle, minced, or dill relish, yellow mustard, grated onion, and mayo, maybe a little salt or pepper if needed for sandwich spread!
    Mary

    I'm not a chef, and I don't play on one television

    Comment


    • #3
      My Pot Roast

      serves 6? LOL they always vary in size. this was a small one.


      Ingredients

      1 3-5 pound chuck Roast
      2 to 3 tablespoons Kitchen bouquet, plus extra for gravy
      2 cups onion, cut into large chunks
      3 large cloves garlic, coarsely chopped or (2-3 tablespoon jarred minced garlic)
      32 ounces beef broth
      1/8 cup Good Cabernet Souvignon, (Optional)
      1 tablespoon garlic powder
      1 tablespoon onion powder
      3 teaspoons Kosher salt (1 ½ teaspoons per side of beef)
      2 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper, (1 teaspoon per side)
      1/8 Extra Virgin Olive Oil
      1 tablespoon Beef Base (or one cube beef bouillon if using bouillon cut salt back)
      ¼ cup cornstarch
      1/3 cup water


      Directions

      1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

      2. Rub half of the kitchen bouquet on top side of beef; season the beef with salt, pepper, onion powder and garlic powder on both sides. Meanwhile heat Dutch oven over medium high heat. Add oil when hot and add Beef; let brown and caramelize on both sides. Remove from pan and add all the onion, (if using wine add now) stir and let sauté for about 5 to 10 minutes to pick up all that goodness from the bottom of the pan. Add beef back to pan add broth, so that about ½ to ¾ of the meat is submerged in the liquid.

      3. Cover and put in the oven for 1 ½ hours. Remove from oven. Remove meat to a platter and set aside. Strain veggies from broth and put broth back into pan and heat to simmer. Add cornstarch and water stirring constantly to thicken.



      Note: If you need more flavor add Better Than Bouillon Beef Base or a little more Kitchen Bouquet.
      Last edited by Semigourmet; 10-31-2014, 08:07 AM.
      Mary

      I'm not a chef, and I don't play on one television

      Comment


      • #4
        leftovers go for this (when I have enough)

        Servings 6




        Ingredients

        1-2 pounds leftover Mary’s Pot Roast, cut into bite size pieces or fresh stew meat.
        3-4 cups Home Made Noodles or fresh pasta
        4-8 cups water
        2 tablespoons kitchen bouquet
        1 tablespoon garlic powder (to taste)
        1 tablespoon onion powder (to taste)
        2 teaspoons black pepper (to taste)
        Plus any leftover gravy if using pot roast leftovers
        3-4 teaspoons beef base (to taste after you add gravy if using)



        Directions

        1. In stock pot Dutch oven add water, seasonings (all but beef base), gravy, and kitchen bouquet. If using fresh stew meat; season and brown meat in pot before adding the remaining ingredients.

        2. Bring to a boil stirring occasionally, check taste to make sure it has enough flavor. Add seasoning if needed.

        3. After it comes to a boil add leftover pot roast now if using. Let return to boil. Stirring constantly add noodles one handful at a time. Stirring between additions to keep noodles from sticking to each other or the noodles. After all noodles have been added and are cooked enough not to stick together. Let cook stirring occasionally for about 5 to 10 minutes or until the noodles are done.

        4. To serve: in a bowl add mashed potatoes, and pour beef and noodles over them mix and eat or have a dinner roll. They are very filling. Enjoy
        Mary

        I'm not a chef, and I don't play on one television

        Comment


        • #5
          Here's my recipe; Pot Roast..jpg




          Old Fashioned Pot Roast (pressure-cooked). 07-23-2012, 06:03 PM

          Ingredients;

          1 4lb chuck beef roast.
          2 Tbls. veggie oil.
          1/2 cup celery, chopped or sliced.
          1 large onion, chopped or sliced.
          1 pkg. dry onion soup mix or 1 can beef consume`.
          2 cups water.
          2 bay leaves.
          1/2 tsp dried thyme.
          3 or 4 cloves chopped garlic.
          6 carrots peeled and cut into 2-inch pieces.
          4 medium potatoes, peeled and quartered.


          For Gravy;

          Heat 2 tablespoons of oil. Add about 2 heaping Tbls. flour. Stir and cook to a medium brown color. Or you can make a slurry mixture with about a 1/2 cup water and the 2 Tbls. flour. Shake or stir vigorously until smooth and lump-free. If desired, add several small drops of dark brown (Gravy Master or Kitchen Bouquet) sauce to slightly darken the gravy.


          Add the browned roux or the slurry mixture to the liquid in the cooker.


          Directions;

          Heat cooker over medium heat. Add oil.

          Lightly season meat on both sides with a little bit of salt, peppr, garlic powder and dried thyme. Brown on all sides.

          Add remaining ingredients except carrots and potatoes.

          Cover cooker with lid, set pressure regulator on vent pipe. Bring to a pressure and lower heat so that steam is gently being emitted from jiggler valve.

          Cook for about 45 minutes. Cool cooker at once. Remove lid and add carrots and potatoes. Cook for about 12 minutes or until veggies are just tender & soft.

          If possible, remove meat and veggies from hot liquid and place on warm serving platter. Make the gravy (above) Add roux or slurry mixture to hot liquid. Cook and stir unti thickened. Adjust seasonings if needed or desired.

          Serve over hot cooked rice, mashed taters or your favorite pasta.


          Enjoy!

          Note: This recipe can also be done in a regular Dutch Oven on the stove, in the oven, or in your slow cooker. But just brown the meat on the stove first, to sear in the juices of the meat. It is very versatile.

          Cooking times may vary with your particular pressure cooker, or other method that you choose to do it with.
          Last edited by Big Daddy's House; 11-18-2014, 05:50 AM.
          ~BDH.

          I am the King of Kitchen Toys!!!!!! http://www.cookingforums.net/core/im...ilies/wink.png

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Big Daddy's House View Post
            Here's my recipe; [ATTACH=CONFIG]n70716[/ATTACH]


            Old Fashioned Pot Roast (pressure-cooked). 07-23-2012, 06:03 PM

            Ingredients;

            1 4lb chuck beef roast.
            2 Tbls. veggie oil.
            1/2 cup celery, chopped or sliced.
            1 large onion, chopped or sliced.
            1 pkg. dry onion soup mix or 1 can beef consume`.
            2 cups water.
            2 bay leaves.
            1/2 tsp dried thyme.
            3 or 4 cloves chopped garlic.
            6 carrots peeled and cut into 2-inch pieces.
            4 medium potatoes, peeled and quartered.


            For Gravy;

            Heat 2 tablespoons of oil. Add about 2 heaping Tbls. flour. Stir and cook to a medium brown color. Or you can make a slurry mixture with about a 1/2 cup water and the 2 Tbls. flour. Shake or stir vigorously until smooth and lump-free.


            Add the browned roux or the slurry mixture to the liquid in the cooker.


            Directions;

            Heat cooker over medium heat. Add oil.

            Lightly season meat on both sides with a little bit of salt, peppr, garlic powder and dried thyme. Brown on all sides.

            Add remaining ingredients except carrots and potatoes.

            Cover cooker with lid, set pressure regulator on vent pipe. Bring to a pressure and lower heat so that steam is gently being emitted from jiggler valve.

            Cook for about 45 minutes. Cool cooker at once. Remove lid and add carrots and potatoes. Cook for about 12 minutes or until veggies are just tender & soft.

            If possible, remove meat and veggies from hot liquid and place on warm serving platter. Make the gravy (above) Add roux or slurry mixture to hot liquid. Cook and stir unti thickened. Adjust seasonings if needed or desired.

            Serve over hot cooked rice, mashed taters or your favorite pasta.


            Enjoy!

            Note: This recipe can also be done in a regular Dutch Oven on the stove, in the oven, or in your slow cooker. But just brown the meat on the stove first, to sear in the juices of the meat. It is very versatile.

            Cooking times may vary with your particular pressure cooker, or other method that you choose to do it with.

            That looks delish! I've never been a big pot roast fan. I think it's because, somehow or other, the roast still tastes pretty dry, even when soaked in the juices. Still, all these pictures of pot roast are getting me itching for some.

            Comment


            • #7
              I don't think I could imagine eating a roast without gravy, it just seems so wrong to do. If you don't have a food processor is it still okay to use the grinder? I would think so as long as you are not forcing it, right?

              Comment


              • Semigourmet
                Semigourmet commented
                Editing a comment
                I assume you are talking about the sandwich spread. and actually if you have a meat grinder it is the best way to make it. Mom used to put the dill pickle and onion right through the grinder after the beef. then she would put a slice of bread through it to clean it out!

            • #8
              Originally posted by cookiemama View Post


              That looks delish! I've never been a big pot roast fan. I think it's because, somehow or other, the roast still tastes pretty dry, even when soaked in the juices. Still, all these pictures of pot roast
              are getting me itching for some.

              Itch some more, because when you see these photos, I think that you'll be even MORE tempted to want to do one! Hah!!

              033.JPG 034.JPG 035.JPG 036.JPG
              ~BDH.

              I am the King of Kitchen Toys!!!!!! http://www.cookingforums.net/core/im...ilies/wink.png

              Comment


              • #9
                I love a good pot roast, and you are right it disappears pretty fast! Everyone is always asking for seconds. The key is to have all the right ingredients to make the meat succulent. Delicious!

                Comment


                • #10
                  they second key is to have Loads of filling sides so that you might be able to salvage a little bit of that roast for repurposing! LOL
                  Mary

                  I'm not a chef, and I don't play on one television

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    Wow... great tips. I am not really a fan of pot roast. I think it is because it is boring. I am going to try some of these ideas in hopes that my pot roast will be more flavorful. I do love the side dishes though.

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      It depends on the meat. If it's a pork roast, my secret weapon is apple sauce. It lends very well to gravy, and it tenderizes the meat as it cooks. It gives it a totally different flair than beef roasts. Each have their strengths.

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        It is really one of those comfort foods that you'd love to enjoy, and it is practically a one-pot meal, because it has everything in it that you'd normally cook separately in two or three pots.

                        The only thing that you'd want is a hot bed or rice or noodles to put it on!!
                        ~BDH.

                        I am the King of Kitchen Toys!!!!!! http://www.cookingforums.net/core/im...ilies/wink.png

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          Wow, I have never put pot roast with pasta or rice. only potatoes. LOL we grew up in a Meat and potatoes (and gravy) household.
                          Mary

                          I'm not a chef, and I don't play on one television

                          Comment


                          • #15
                            Our mom cooked rice practically every day, and we didn't have potatoes much, except for mashed, in soup, stew or the pot roast, or in potato salad.
                            ~BDH.

                            I am the King of Kitchen Toys!!!!!! http://www.cookingforums.net/core/im...ilies/wink.png

                            Comment

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