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  • baking powder questions

    I have been baking muffins recently. I opened a can of baking
    powder, which was not past its expiration date or even close to
    it. I realized last night that it must, nonetheless, be old,
    because the muffins just are not rising much. Sooo, I am wondering:

    1) Does BP age in an unopened can? I note that the cans are not
    all metal now, so I imagine the cardboard would not offer the same
    level of protection.

    2. Do all double-acting BPs have the same leavening power? The
    one I have open is Rumford, but I have always used Calumet in the
    past. For some odd reason, Calumet is almost impossible to find
    here now.

    Thanks

  • #2
    Try searching the Web.
    ~BDH.

    I am the King of Kitchen Toys!!!!!! http://www.cookingforums.net/core/im...ilies/wink.png

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by xumeng12 View Post
      I have been baking muffins recently. I opened a can of baking
      powder, which was not past its expiration date or even close to
      it. I realized last night that it must, nonetheless, be old,
      because the muffins just are not rising much. Sooo, I am wondering:

      1) Does BP age in an unopened can? I note that the cans are not
      all metal now, so I imagine the cardboard would not offer the same
      level of protection.

      2. Do all double-acting BPs have the same leavening power? The
      one I have open is Rumford, but I have always used Calumet in the
      past. For some odd reason, Calumet is almost impossible to find
      here now.

      Thanks
      You can test the baking powder by pouring boiling water over it. Take a small bowl and add a couple tablespoons of baking powder in it and pour boiling water over it. If you get an immediate and violent reaction, it is good to go, if it does nothing, or just fizzles, it is too old.

      I use Rumford exclusively, it is a very trusted brand. I choose this because it is aluminum free, and has a cleaner flavor especially in things that contain a lot of it like biscuits. Calumet is not common her in the south. I usually see store brand, Rumford, and Argo.
      Check out my baking blog! bakingbetter.com

      Comment


      • #4
        I never knew that baking powder can get too old!

        I have a large food-service-style container, had it for a while, and it hasn't failed me yet. It is almost empty though. I think though, that I'll go back to the smaller containers of it, such as Calmut or Rumford.

        Didn't know that Argo makes it either. I'm used to seeing cornstarch made by them.
        ~BDH.

        I am the King of Kitchen Toys!!!!!! http://www.cookingforums.net/core/im...ilies/wink.png

        Comment


        • #5
          I moved this thread to the Baking forum, since it has to do with baking and that this is a leavening agent that is used in baking cakes and quick breads.
          ~BDH.

          I am the King of Kitchen Toys!!!!!! http://www.cookingforums.net/core/im...ilies/wink.png

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Big Daddy's House View Post
            I never knew that baking powder can get too old!

            I have a large food-service-style container, had it for a while, and it hasn't failed me yet. It is almost empty though. I think though, that I'll go back to the smaller containers of it, such as Calmut or Rumford.

            Didn't know that Argo makes it either. I'm used to seeing cornstarch made by them.
            it sure can get too old. I replace mine every year. I usually go through quite a bit, but if I have some come the holiday season, I just chuck it and get a new can.

            I've only seen argo around for a couple years. I've used it and it worked fine, it is also aluminum free. It's in a container similar to their cornstarch, a squat plastic container. I had both the cornstarch and baking powder in my pantry and kept grabbing the wrong one, even though they are not actually the same size. I went back to the familiar red can from Rumford.
            Check out my baking blog! bakingbetter.com

            Comment


            • #7
              I just bought the large yellow plastic container of Argo corn starch during the holiday season. To eventually replace the one in the box when it's all gone.
              ~BDH.

              I am the King of Kitchen Toys!!!!!! http://www.cookingforums.net/core/im...ilies/wink.png

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Whoopie Pie View Post
                You can test the baking powder by pouring boiling water over it. Take a small bowl and add a couple tablespoons of baking powder in it and pour boiling water over it. If you get an immediate and violent reaction, it is good to go, if it does nothing, or just fizzles, it is too old.

                I use Rumford exclusively, it is a very trusted brand. I choose this because it is aluminum free, and has a cleaner flavor especially in things that contain a lot of it like biscuits. Calumet is not common her in the south. I usually see store brand, Rumford, and Argo.



                I was just at the supermarket a while ago to pick up a few things.

                Saw the Argo baking powder. It was cheaper than Rumford and Davis, so I got the Argo instead. Also, it is aluminum free.
                ~BDH.

                I am the King of Kitchen Toys!!!!!! http://www.cookingforums.net/core/im...ilies/wink.png

                Comment


                • #9
                  I have Argo too, partly because of it being aluminum free.
                  My Food Blog : Eat Like No One Else ~ http://www.eatlikenoone.com

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                  • #10
                    The thing with baking powder is that once the cream of tartar is mixed with the bicarbonate of soda if it comes into contact with moisture they will start reacting and become less effective. It surprises me that baking powder would come in a cardboard container for this reason, because card is obviously porous. I buy an supermarket brand one which comes in a plastic container which I have never had a problem with, but I also get through it pretty speedily.

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                    • #11
                      Even I was facing a similar problem. But didn't know that the baking powder will not work properly if it is old. Now I understand that why my cakes are not coming perfect.
                      One more question I would like to ask you all that what is the difference between baking soda and baking powder?

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                      • #12
                        Baking soda is actually bicarbonate of soda, aka, Sodium Bicarbonate.

                        Baking powder is a combination of bicarbonate of soda and cream of tarter.
                        Last edited by Big Daddy's House; 10-12-2011, 01:23 AM.
                        ~BDH.

                        I am the King of Kitchen Toys!!!!!! http://www.cookingforums.net/core/im...ilies/wink.png

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Hello! I'm sorry, that is not the topic! I really like your forum! Thank you, I'm with you)
                          mybestwestern.com

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